2003 Shepherd's Conference, A Ministry of Grace Community Church 818.909.5530.  © 2003 All Rights Reserved. Grace Community Church. A CD, MP3, or tape cassette copy of this session can be obtained by going to www.shepherdsconference.org

 

 

Expository Preaching-Turning Exegesis into Exposition

(Handout – Study Notes)

 

Carey Hardy

Pastor, Adult and Family Ministries

 

 

INTRO

 

Preaching can be reduced to these 3 concepts:

 

            1.         Exposing the people to the text

            2.         Explaining what it means by what it says

            3.         Exhorting them to live by it

 

 

Greatest task of the preacher is to get himself out of the text.

 

 

But…there is no virtue in sloppiness.  WE SHOULD GIVE GOD OUR BEST!

 

John MacArthur:          A boring preacher is a contradiction in terms.

 

 

Walter C. Kaiser:         Exegesis is never an end in itself.  Its purposes are never fully realized until it

begins to take into account the problems of transferring what has been learned from the text over to the waiting Church.  To put it more bluntly, exegesis must come to terms with the audience as well as with what the author meant by the words he used.

 

John MacArthur:          Preaching an expository message involves far more than standing in the pulpit

and reviewing the high points, details, and components unearthed through research.  Neither a word study nor a running commentary on a passage is, in itself, an expository sermon.  An expository sermon does more than simply explain the grammatical structure of a passage and the meanings of its words.  A true expository message sets forth the principles or doctrines supported in the passage.  True expository preaching is doctrinal preaching.

 

The proper elements in an expository sermon may be summed up as follows:

 

1.  Preaching is expository in purpose.  It explains the text.

2.  Preaching is logical in flow.  It persuades the mind.

3.  Preaching is doctrinal in content.  It obligates the will.

4.  Preaching is pastoral in concern.  It feeds the soul.

5.  Preaching is imaginative in pattern.  It excites the emotion.

6.  Preaching is relevant in application.  It touches the life.

 

The task of the expository preacher is to take the mass of raw data from the text and bridge the gap between exegesis and exposition.

 

 

I.          DETERMINE A Propositional Statement

           

·         It is a single sentence that functions as the hinge between the introduction and the body of a message.

 

·         It is a statement of the objective of the sermon.

·         It is not a restatement of the title.

·         It transfers attention to the body.

·         It is a simple sentence stating the theme to be amplified, explained, or proved.

·         The theme is the overall subject (e.g. faith)...the proposition limits the theme, gives aim to the theme (e.g. three aspects of faith).

·         When it comes to the actual organization of the sermon, the prepositional statement is the most important feature.

 

·         Can be expressed in more than one way.

Ų      statement—In this passage we will examine four characteristics of a man of integrity that will help us understand what it means to be a man after God’s own heart.

 

Ų      question—What are some reasons for trusting God when you’re in the midst of a trial?

 

Ų      exhortation—As we study this passage, commit yourself to following these four steps to resolving conflict in your marriage:

 

Ų      exclamation—What a joy it is to contemplate the three proofs of God’s sovereignty that we find in this passage!

 

·         Should be expressed as concisely and clearly as possible.

·         Contains a “key word”…a plural noun… for example, 4 reasons, 3 facts, 6 ingredients, 3 elements, etc.

 

The key word is always a plural noun that characterizes the main points.  The following are a few of the many key words

 

 


abuses

actualities

accusations

admonitions

affairs

affirmations

agreements

alternatives

angles

answers

applications

approaches

areas

arguments

aspects

aspirations

assertions

assurances

assumptions

attitudes

attributes

avocations

axioms

 

barriers

beginnings

beliefs

benefits

bequests

bestowments

blemishes

blessings

blows

blockades

blots

blunders

boasts

bonds

books

boundaries

breaches

burdens

 

calls

categories

causes

certainties

challenges

changes

charges

circumstances

commands

commitments

comparisons

conceptions

concessions

corrections

criteria

criticisms

crowns

cults

cultures

customs

 

dangers

debts

decisions

declarations

deeds

deficiencies

definitions

degrees

departments

details

differences

directives

disciplines

disclosures

discoveries

divisions

doctrines

doubts

doors

dreams

duties

 

editions

effects

elements

encouragements

examples

excesses

exchanges

exclamations

experiments

explanations

exponents

exposures

expositions

expostulations

expressions

extremes

 

facets

facts

factors

faculties

failures

falls

families

faults

fears

feelings

fields

finalities

flaws

forces

forms

formalities

foundations

functions

fundamentals

 

gains

generalizations

gifts

graces

groups

guarantees

guides

habits

handicaps

honors

hopes

hungers

hurts

 

ideas

ideals

idols

ills

illuminations

illustrations

imitations

impacts

impediments

imperatives

imperfections

implements

implications

impossibilities

impressions

improvements

inadequacies

incentives

incidents

ingredients

injunctions

invitations

irritations

issues

items

joys

judgments

justifications

 

keys

kinds

 

labors

lapses

laws

leads

lessons

levels

liabilities

liberties

lifts

lights

limits

links

lists

loads

locations

looks

losses

loyalties

 

manifestations

manners

marks

materials

means

measures

meetings

members

memories

mentions

mercies

methods

ministries

miseries

misfortunes

mistakes

models

moods

motives

mountains

movements

mysteries

 

names

narratives

natures

necessities

needs

nights

norms

notes

numbers

objects

objectives

obligations

observances

obstacles

occasions

occurrences

offenses

offers

offices

omissions

operations

opinions

opponents

options

orders

organizations

origins

 

panaceas

parables

paradoxes

paragraphs

parallels

particulars

parties

parts

paths

patterns

peaks

peculiarities

penalties

perceptions

perfections

performances

perils

periods

perplexities

persons

personalities

petitions

phases

philosophies

phrases

pictures

pieces

places

plagues

plans

pleas

pledges

plots

points

positions

possibilities

powers

practices

prayers

precautions

predicaments

predictions

premises

preparations

prescriptions

pressures

pretensions

principles

privileges

prizes

problems

processes

products

profits

prohibitions

promises

proofs

prophecies

propositions

prospects

provisions

punishments

purposes

pursuits

 

qualifications

qualities

quantities

queries

quests

questions

quotas

quotations

 

ranks

ratings

reactions

reasons

recommendations

records

recruits

references

regions

regulations

rejections

relapses

relations

responses

restraints

results

revelations

rewards

roads

roles

roots

routes

rules

 

sacrifices

satisfactions

sayings

scales

scars

schools

schemes

seals

secrets

selections

sentiments

sequences

services

shields

situations

skills

solicitations

solutions

sources

spheres

states

statements

steps

stipulations

stresses

strokes

styles

subjects

sufferings

superlatives

suppositions

superiorities

supports

symptoms

systems

 

tactics

talents

tasks

teachings

tendencies

tests

theories

theses

thoughts

ties

times

titles

tokens

tones

topics

traces

traits

treasures

trends

trials

triumphs

troubles

truths

types

uncertainties

undertakings

units

urges

uses

 

vacancies

values

variations

varieties

ventures

verifications

views

violations

virtues

visions

vocations

voices

 

wants

warnings

ways

weaknesses

weapons

words

works

worries

wrongs

 

yieldings

yokes

 

zones


 

 

1 Sam. 15:13-31  Diagnosing Heart Disease

 

This narrative portion of Scripture gives us, by way of illustration, four symptoms of an unrepentant heart…

 

Psalm 3            Assurance in the Face of Adversity

 

As we look into this psalm we’ll make three observations about David’s response to his trial, so that you know how God expects you to respond to your own difficult circumstances.

 

Psalm 14          The Dark Side

 

…note with me three aspects of the principle of depravity…

 

Psalm 27          No Fear

 

…where we find four essential keys to living a life without fear…

 

1 Cor. 1:18-25 The Foolishness of God

 

Unlike any other message, the gospel is a message of power…and this makes it both unique and superior to anything the world could ever offer.

 

In this passage, Paul presents three arguments in an effort to affirm the gospel’s inherent uniqueness and superiority, so that you’ll be encouraged to stay true to the time-tested message about Christ.

 

1 Cor. 1:26-31 Something from Nothing

 

…in these verses we find three features of God’s plan for saving lost man from His sin…

 

1 Cor. 3:5-9     Ministry Down on the Farm

 

In the process of challenging their misguided thinking, Paul uses the setting of a “farm” or working in a “field” to give us some insight into ministry…into how God sees ministry, and thus how WE are to see ministry.

 

In verses 5 to 9 we’ll take note of three views of biblical ministry…

 

1 Cor. 3:18-23 Rags or Riches?

 

…so Paul points out two reasons why this love of worldly wisdom is such a terrible error to make…

 

1 Cor. 4:1-5     Having Roasted Pastor for Sunday Lunch

 

…so to help them, and us, have this proper attitude, Paul answers two questions about the nature of the pastor’s role in the church…

 

Eph. 2:1-3        The Living Dead

 

…specifically in verses 1-10 we find three aspects of God’s intervention on behalf of man that help us gain a comprehension of the magnitude of God’s power in salvation…the magnitude of what He’s done for us.

 

Phil. 1:12-18    God:  The Divine Alchemist

 

…these three affirmations that Paul makes concerning the gospel provide the evidence we need to know without a doubt that Paul was living for the kingdom of God, and not his own personal goals or agenda.

 

Phil. 3:4-7        Spiritual Bankruptcy

 

…let’s look at Paul’s spiritual balance sheet—his list of assets and liabilities from two different perspectives….

 

Phil. 4:6-7        God’s Antidote for Anxiety

 

…there is an answer…an antidote…prescription…and that antidote is prayer.  In our passage Paul presents three facts about prayer that prove God’s antidote for anxiety is superior to any other answer.

 

 

 

II.        CONSTRUCT AN APPROPRIATE OUTLINE

 

·         The outline is a valuable help to the listener.

 

·         There is more than one possible homiletical outline.

 

·         It should reflect syntactical analysis.

 

·         Don’t force an outline upon a text.

·         Each main point should serve a specific purpose—to fulfill the proposition.

·         There are three primary types of major points:

Ų      Markers of the text

1.  The Command

2.  The Method

3.  The Results

 

1.  Selective Obedience

2.  Superficial Confessions

3.  Selfish Motivations

4.  Shallow Externalism

 

1.  The Basic Essence of Depravity

2.  The Pervasive Extent of Depravity

3.  The Sobering End of Depravity

 

1.  The Unique Necessity of Christian Love

2.  The Distinctive Character of Christian Love

3.  The Sobering Test of Christian Love

 

Ų      Statements/questions

1.  Prayer is Comprehensive

2.  Prayer is Required

3.  Prayer is Effective

 

1.  David Recognized Life’s Pressures

2.  David Rested in God’s Provision

3.  David Rejoiced in Salvation’s Promise

 

1.  Worship Involves Celebration

2.  Worship Involves Adoration

3.  Worship Involves Expectation

 

1.  What Does God Expect You to Do?

2.  Where Does God Expect You to Go?

3.  Why Does God Expect You to Obey?

 

 

Ų      Directives

1.  Understand God’s Process

2.  Embrace God’s Will

3.  Depend on God’s Strength

4.  Imitate God’s Love

 

1.  Be Genuine

2.  Be Sacrificial

3.  Be Diligent

 

 

·         Be careful that outline points are not too complicated.

 

·         Major points need to be clear.

·         Parallelism is important.

·         Any subordinate points should relate to the main point.

·         Too many sub-points are cumbersome.

 

III.       MAINTAIN A LOGICAL FLOW OF THOUGHT  

 

·         Insures that the structure of your message is not obscured.

·         Enables audience to identify and follow movement from one major outline point to the next.

·         Important to eliminate hindrances to a clear flow of thought, such as:

Ž     No proposition or purpose statement

Ž     Complicated outline points

Ž     Unwieldy alliteration (or forced alliteration)

Ž     Changing the key propositional word

Ž     Lack of parallelism

Ž     Lack of clear transition statements

John A. Broadus    Transition may be formally defined as both the act and means of moving from one part of the sermon to another, from one division to another, and from one idea to another.  Transitions are to sermons what joints are to the bones of the body.  “They are the bridges of the discourse, and by them” the preacher moves from point to point.

 

Transition statements:

 

Ų         Should be thought through ahead of time.

Ų         Should stand out from rest of the message.

 

Ž     Not reviewing outline points with congregation

Ž     Too much review

Ž     Lack of familiarity with the content of the message

Ž     Too many tangents

Ž     Dwelling too long on a tangent

Ž     Illustrations that don’t apply

Ž     Use of abstract language (obscure words)

 

CONCLUSION

Preaching is your most important task.  All other ministry must be based upon a clear, accurate, and passionate exposition of biblical truth.

 

This is your calling…work hard at doing it well.

 

Resources:

 

Rediscovering Expository Preaching, by John MacArthur and TMS Faculty

Preaching & Preachers, by D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones

The Supremacy of God in Preaching, by John Piper

Preaching with Purpose, by Jay Adams

Power in the Pulpit: How to Prepare and Deliver Expository Sermons, by Jerry Vines/Jim

Shaddix

Scripture Sculpture, by Ramesh Richard

Between Two Worlds, by John Stott

Exegetical Fallacies, by D.A. Carson

Toward an Exegetical Theology, by Walter Kaiser, Jr.

On the Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, John A. Broadus

The Preacher and Preaching, by Samuel T. Logan, Jr.

 

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